Mini Lesson For Writing Conclusions For Argumentative Essays

Writing Conclusions Worksheets

Almost all writing is divided into three sections: introduction, body, and conclusion. Students rarely have trouble writing the body of a piece. It is the heart of the composition and includes the major points. Introductions and conclusions are more challenging. The conclusion, for example, is usually a brief summation of the piece, with any final call to action or closing thoughts. Practicing conclusion writing helps students with this important composition skill. Check out all of our writing worksheets!

Important Writing Parts: Introduction, Body and Conclusion

This is a great exercise for students to learn about the different writing parts. Areas for an introduction, conclusion, and body are designated to make writing fun and easy. Print out this free worksheet for your students today!

Grade Levels:
2nd and 3rd Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
W.3.1.D

Conclusion Checklist

Here is a free printable worksheet to help students learn to write a strong conclusion. This worksheet contains a checklist to help students know they have all the correct components to write a strong conclusion. From restatement of thesis to supporting facts, this worksheet has it all.

Grade Levels:
4th and 5th Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
W.4.1.D, W.5.1.D,

Write the Conclusion: Giant Panda

A conclusion is a short series of statements that leave the reader with a basic summary of a paper. With this free worksheet, students will read an article and write their own conclusion. A printable worksheet is a grerat tool for budding writers!

Grade Levels:
4th and 5th Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
W.4.2.D, W.5.2.D,

Write the Conclusion: The Tower of London

Students will read a short article on The Tower of London and write their own conclusion in this worksheet.

Grade Levels:
4th and 5th Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
W.4.2.D, W.5.2.D,

Write the Conclusion: The U.S. Census

A conclusion is a short summary of the writing, meant to leave the reader with the basic information in the piece. Students will read the article on the U.S. Census and write their own conclusion.

Grade Levels:
4th and 5th Grade, 6th - 8th Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
W.5.2.D, W.6.1.E, W.7.1.E

Write the Conclusion: The U.S. Congress

Here is an informational piece about the U.S. Congress. Read the text and write a conclusion summing up the important points.

Grade Levels:
4th and 5th Grade, 6th - 8th Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
W.5.2.D, W.6.1.E

Write the Conclusion: When a Tornado Is Coming

Conclusions are an important part of writing. It is a short summary of the writing, meant to leave the reader with the basic information in the piece

Grade Levels:
4th and 5th Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
W.4.2.D, W.5.2.D,

Write the Conclusion: Hawaii, the Aloha State

The article Hawaii, the Aloha State needs an ending. Have your students read the article and write a conclusion.

Grade Levels:
6th - 8th Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
W.6.1.E, W.7.1.E, W.8.1.E

Write the Conclusion: Why the Moon?

Students will write their own conclusion with this activity. Print out the free worksheet Why the Moon for your students to read. They will then write a conclusion, remembering to include important parts of the article.

Grade Levels:
6th - 8th Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
W.6.1.E, W.7.1.E, W.8.1.E

Write a Conclusion: Voting

A strongly written conclusion can sway a reader one way or another. When writing persuasive articles it is important that you restate your thesis and give strong supporting ideas. The conclusion is the last chance you will have to sway your readers. This free printable worksheet is perfect for students to practice writing conclusions.

Grade Levels:
9th - 12th Grade, Grades K-12
CCSS Code(s):
W.9-10.1.E, W.11-12.1.E

Overview

Featured Resources

From Theory to Practice

 

OVERVIEW

As part of the drafting and revision process for a current literary analysis essay (or another type of argument), students first participate in initial peer review to improve the argument in their essay. Then they inquire into published tips and advice on writing conclusions and analyze sample conclusions with a partner before choosing two strategies they would like to try in their own writing, drafting a conclusion that employs each.  After writing two different conclusions and conferring with a peer about them, they choose one and reflect on why they chose it, as well as what they learned about writing conclusions and the writing process more broadly.  Though this lesson is framed around an argumentative literary essay, its structure could be easily adapted to other written forms.

back to top

 

FEATURED RESOURCES

List of Online Resources for Writing Conclusions:  Organized in two parts, these resources allow students to inquire into different published advice on writing conclusions to academic essays and then offer students sample essays to review and critique.


Conclusion Inquiry Guide:  Students use these prompts to guide their inquiry into advice on writing conclusions and sample argumentative essays.

back to top

 

FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE

The conclusions to student essays are often formulaic restatements of the key ideas of their introductions.  While there is fairly wide agreement on strategies for constructing and improving introductions, there are fewer resources investigating “how to conclude,” partly perhaps because of the very context- and piece-specific nature of what a conclusion might do.

This lesson, then, draws heavily on two ideas from the more foundational NCTE Beliefs about the Teaching of Writing to guide students through inquiry into the genre of the argumentative essay and what function the conclusion can serve:

  • “Developing writers require support. This support can best come through carefully designed writing instruction oriented toward acquiring new strategies and skills.”

  • “As is the case with many other things people do, getting better at writing requires doing it -- a lot. This means actual writing, not merely listening to lectures about writing, doing grammar drills, or discussing readings. The more people write, the easier it gets and the more they are motivated to do it.”


Students participating in this lesson are supported in the specific task of drafting multiple conclusions to an essay to determine which is most effective, a process that itself involves significant writing to achieve.

Writing Study Group of the NCTE Executive Committee. 2016. Professional Knowledge for the Teaching of Writing. February 2016. Web. http://www.ncte.org/positions/statements/teaching-writing

back to top

0 Thoughts to “Mini Lesson For Writing Conclusions For Argumentative Essays

Leave a comment

L'indirizzo email non verrà pubblicato. I campi obbligatori sono contrassegnati *